Sunscreen Prevents Melanoma?

Melanoma is the most serious of skin cancers, so much so that prevention is key. We know to use sunscreen, wear protective clothing, reduce sun exposure during sun intense times of the day, and if you’re fair skinned, stay out of the sun as much as humanly possible. Up until now, there was no research that proved sunscreen prevented melanoma. We’ve known sunburn can lead to melanoma, and sunscreen prevents sunburn, but not a direct correlation that sunscreen prevents melanoma. Enter the mouse model, a little 30 SPF sunscreen and UVB light which is the ultraviolet light that burns the skin.

http://www.useloveshare.com/FIC/candace/product/?i=10

Day Defense Plus 25 SPF Sunscreen by Apriori Beauty

A study done by Cristin Burd, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and the Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology & Medical Genetics at The OSUCCC — James, showed that “application of sun protection factor 30 (SPF30) sunscreen prior to exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model.” [Read more…]

Melanoma – Quickly Learn Your Risk

Melanoma is serious, which is why any way to find out if we could be at a higher risk for it is a good thing.

http://www.lookfordiagnosis.com/mesh_info.php?term=Nevus&lang=1

A mole (nevus)

“Researchers at King’s College London have investigated a new method that could be used by General Practitioners to quickly determine the number of moles on the entire body by counting the number found on a smaller ‘proxy’ body area, such as an arm.”

The number of moles on a particular area of the arm can be used to pretty accurately determine the risk for developing melanoma. In the absence of suspicious moles, this is a very simple way to send a warning to go see a dermatologist on a regular basis so he/she gets to know your moles, has a diagram of their location on your body and description of them documented. Over time, if they change or new ones form, your doctor will have a clearer idea of how to care for them and when to biopsy or remove.

“Scientists found that the count of moles on the right arm was most predictive of the total number on the whole body. Females with more than seven moles on their right arm had nine times the risk of having more than 50 on the whole body and those with more than 11 on their right arm were more likely to have over 100 on their body in total, meaning they were at a higher risk of developing a melanoma.”

I will be counting mine and letting my Dermatologist in on this new research finding, as well.

Start counting yours, too!

“Scientists also found that the area above the right elbow was particularly predictive of the total body count of moles. The legs were also strongly associated with the total count as well as the back area in males.”

Read more about this research at Science Daily

…where they describe a mole as being a nevus (- usually dark brown and basically flat).

 

Sun Damage Continues On After Exposure

A recent study has demonstrated that UV damage continues on for hours after exposure to the sun.  Once you come into the shade, you are not safe, it seems. There appears to be a cellular process which begins with the sun’s rays shining down upon your skin, and then keeps going for hours, even increasing the damage over time.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/13299761370278855/

Sun Damage even in the Shade

[Read more…]

Basal Cell, Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Melanoma – What’s the Difference?

basal cell carcinomaBasal Cell Carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer. It is slow growing and easily treated with a small percentage spreading internally. It develops on the skin, most commonly the head and neck, growing from the deepest layers of the epidermis, in areas most exposed to the sun.

Squamaous Cell Carcinoma is the second most common skin cancer.

Squamous cell carcinomas tend to grow and spread more than basal cell cancers. They are more likely to invade fatty tissues just beneath the skin, and are more likely to spread to lymph nodes and/or distant parts of the body, although this is still uncommon.” [Read more…]

Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.