11 More Tips for a Successful Interview

I’m conducting interviews right now, looking to add a partner with whom to share my day to day responsibilities, evening and weekend call. The job description I created states clearly what the position entails and the qualifications / qualities of the successful candidate are.

Now that a few candidates have been interviewed, I thought it might be a good time to add to my previous post sharing “Tips for Success in Your Job Interview”.

http://www.southafrica.jobs-employment.com/2016/03/06/steps-to-a-successful-job-interview/

  1. Re and ReRead the Job Description. I highly recommend studying the job description, and visualizing yourself in the role. This provides a greater understanding of the point of view interview questions will be coming from, and allow you time to think of clarifying questions. You might also do an online search for descriptions of similar roles and how they function.
  2. Proofread your resume and cover letter for typos and grammar errors. Have someone who is a proficient writer also review and edit for clarity and polish. A good cover letter goes a long way in preceding your first personal meeting with a glimpse of your personality, intelligence, character, and heart.
  3. Come with additional resumes, letters of recommendation, or anything you think might be beneficial, but not overwhelming, to a first and second round interview. Offer them only if you see that it would be useful to do so, such as if there are interviewers present who have not seen your resume, you may offer them a copy.
  4. Jot down questions to bring with you to the interview. Practice these questions on someone who will provide honest and professional feedback. A question like “Why should I work for you?” may not be received very well if delivered in an overly confident way. Perhaps something along the line of “This position is of great interest to me. What will you offer as support for the new team member?”
  5. Really listen to the questions being asked and answer the question. If you don’t fully understand what is being asked, repeat the question in a little different way for clarification. Better ask for clarification than to respond to something that wasn’t being asked. Also, listen to what the interviewers are seeking to know. If you are asked how quickly you can arrive if called in, give the time it would take you if you hung up the phone and hopped in your car immediately. Then, follow up with a confirmation question asking what would be an acceptable length of time for arrival, in case you weren’t coming from home, you would know how far away you could be while on call.
  6. If you haven’t interviewed in awhile, by all means, practice with someone. Better yet, have them record your practice, and review how you come across together.
  7. When you’re asked to tell about yourself as the first question, you don’t want to spew volumes of your work history in great detail. Practice beforehand giving a one minute overview, highlighting accomplishments which would speak for your competence in the position you are interviewing for.
  8. While handshakes are good coming and going, they aren’t always necessary, and one that is too strong might not be received very well. If you’re going to shake hands, do so with the key interviewers.
  9. Always ask what the next steps will be, and the time frame for them. You may be the first to be interviewed, of which the first round process may take a few weeks. It’s good to know if you will be waiting a couple of weeks to hear for a second round interview, and who the second round will be with, so you can begin preparing right away. Make sure you let them know you are very interested in the position (if you still are) at the end of the conversation.
  10. Push in your chair once you have stood to leave. Thank the interviewers for their time, let them know it was a pleasure to meet them, and you look forward to hearing from them soon.
  11. Just like a good cover letter, a good thank you email later that day or the next morning will help solidify positive feelings about you, granted the interview went well. An excellent email thank you doesn’t require following with a handwritten note, unless it is of value as a function of the position.

Good luck!

If any of my tips help you, please come back to let me know!

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