Do This With Your Cell Phone if You Want Focused Thinking

To be able to retain and process information optimally, keep your cell phone far away from you. Recent research shows this to be true through studies done on almost 800 smart phone users.

“Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach — even if it’s off. That’s the takeaway finding from a new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.

The findings suggest that the mere presence of one’s smartphone reduces available cognitive capacity and impairs cognitive functioning, even though people feel they’re giving their full attention and focus to the task at hand. “We see a linear trend that suggests that as the smartphone becomes more noticeable, participants’ available cognitive capacity decreases,” Ward said. “Your conscious mind isn’t thinking about your smartphone, but that process — the process of requiring yourself to not think about something — uses up some of your limited cognitive resources. It’s a brain drain.””

Put Your Cell Away to Focus and be Present

How funny that those tested exerted so much energy on trying not to pay attention to their cell phones that it significantly decreased their ability to focus and concentrate. It’s kind of like “Pavlov’s Dog” with the dog anticipating the bell ringing, and can’t think of any thing else but that the bell will ring soon and they certainly don’t want to miss it. This could add to the existing body of knowledge that shows cell phone addiction, don’t you think? I guess my “note to self” from this study is to turn off and put my phone out of sight in order to be fully present in relating to others and focusing on tasks at hand!


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Citations from ScienceDaily.com


Journal Reference:

  1. Adrian F. Ward, Kristen Duke, Ayelet Gneezy, Maarten W. Bos. Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity. Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, 2017; 2 (2): 140 DOI: 10.1086/691462
About Candace

Candace Dye is an Apriori Beauty Consultant and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Her passion is helping others to uncover and enhance their true inner radiance with tips for health, wellness, skin care and beauty!

Speak Your Mind

*

Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.