Great Reason for a High Protein Breakfast Every Day!

coffee and a muffinCoffee and a bran muffin used to be my standard breakfast when I was a younger, thinner version of myself. Through the years, especially when my children entered the picture, I found myself hungrier from all the physical activity of  chasing them around, and eating heartier meals. Now that they are grown, I’ve gotten rid of the gluten, and with that a lot of starchy carbs, going to higher protein meals with a mix of lean meats, cottage cheese, and eggs. I’m also eating my largest meal of the day at lunch.

Looks like there is a greater benefit to eating higher protein for breakfast other than staying full longer. It is now being shown to help control your blood glucose and insulin levels, helping to fend off diabetes.

Here’s from Consuming High Protein Breakfasts Help Women Maintain Glucose Control…”

“In healthy individuals, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases after eating. When glucose increases, levels of insulin increase to carry the glucose to the rest of the body. Previous research has shown that extreme increases in glucose and insulin in the blood can lead to poor glucose control and increase an individual’s risk of developing diabetes over time. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that when women consumed high-protein breakfasts, they maintained better glucose and insulin control than they did with lower-protein or no-protein meals.

high protein breakfastKevin Maki, of Biofortis Clinical Research, completed the study in collaboration with Leidy. They studied women aged 18-55 years old who consumed one of three different meals or only water on four consecutive days. The tested meals were less than 300 calories per serving and had similar fat and fiber contents. However, the meals varied in amount of protein: a pancake meal with three grams of protein; a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 30 grams of protein; or a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 39 grams protein. Researchers monitored the amount of glucose and insulin in the participants’ blood for four hours after they ate breakfast.

Both protein-rich breakfasts led to lower spikes in glucose and insulin after meals compared to the low-protein, high-carb breakfast,” Maki said. “Additionally, the higher-protein breakfast containing 39 grams of protein led to lower post-meal spikes compared to the high-protein breakfast with 30 grams of protein.

For women, eating more protein in the morning can beneficially affect their glucose and insulin levels,” said Heather Leidy, an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology. “If you eat healthy now and consume foods that help you control your glucose levels, you may be protecting yourself from developing diabetes in the future.”

Next time you go to the market, look at the protein content of items in the dairy and meat sections, look at some of the protein powders if you like to get your boost from  smoothies, and also look at some of the vegetable proteins – like pea protein, and soy.

There are also a lot of precooked proteins in the freezer section for a quick fix grab – and – go breakfast. Now you don’t have any reasons to skip your high protein breakfast!

About Candace

Candace Dye is an Apriori Beauty Consultant and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Her passion is helping others to uncover and enhance their true inner radiance with tips for health, wellness, skin care and beauty!

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